MEDIA RELEASE: ‘Open Data’: Too much sharing, too little care? Who’s reading your health information now?

There can be benefits from the ‘sharing’ (distribution) of health and other personal information  among health care professionals and researchers. Any such ‘sharing’ must, however, be based on an understanding of potential risks. It must only occur within an effective legal framework, and controls appropriate for those risks. A ‘Trust me, I’m from the government!’… Read More

MEDIA RELEASE: Why is the government planning to gather all Australian’s Medical Data? … and will not be running a mass media campaign to let you know how to opt-out.

It is reported recently [1] that the Federal government will be registering everyone who doesn’t already have one for a My Health Record but has no intention of proactively informing Australians of this gross invasion of their privacy. My Health Record is designed to store data on government servers about your medical treatment. As Mr… Read More

MEDIA RELEASE: Does privacy matter less if your data is breached by your State Government?

APF says NO! Go NSW!The Australian Privacy Foundation (APF) advocates for the privacy of all Australians, whether from Dubbo, Darlinghurst, Dapto or Darwin. While we often have to draw critical attention to privacy problems, we like to give credit where it’s due: NSW parliament is contemplating a positive step that others should follow.State and Territory… Read More

MEDIA RELEASE: Comprehensive national face database incompatible with a free society

Australia’s leading privacy and civil liberties organisations condemn the decision by the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) to provide all images from state and territory driver’s licence databases to the federal National Facial Biometric Matching Capability.
These organisations are the Australian Privacy Foundation, Digital Rights Watch, Queensland Council for Civil Liberties, NSW Council for Civil Liberties, Liberty Victoria, South Australian Council for Civil Liberties and Electronic Frontiers Australia. Read More

MEDIA RELEASE: Big Brother Arrives By Public Transport

Are you going to kiss goodbye to your privacy every time you use a bus, train, or City Cat in Brisbane?
The Australian Privacy Foundation, the nation’s civil society organisation concerned with privacy, today strongly condemned proposals for biometric scanning of people using public transport in Brisbane.
Foundation spokesperson Dr Monique Mann said “comprehensive scanning will not work. It is not necessary. It is contrary to the right to privacy expected by all Australians”. Read More

MEDIA RELEASE: Attacks on Encryption: Privacy, Civil Society and the Surveillance State

The Australian Government’s intention to pursue new and increased powers to access encrypted communications via statutorily required ‘backdoors’ has been met with wide-ranging privacy and information security concerns.
On 5 October 2017, a panel of encryption experts, international privacy law experts, academics, politicians, digital rights advocates, and journalists will unpack the social and technical consequences of the proposed new ‘backdooring’ powers. Read More

Kissing goodbye to your health privacy? Governments must work harder.

This week ID information from the financial records of over 120 million people in the United States was hacked – the latest reminder that IT security failure is a global epidemic. Health records are just as valuable to hackers. The current system for storing and using health records in Australia is hopelessly deficient. But with lousy data security, and a world where data breaches are a daily event, the Australian Government’s reluctance to fix this problem is looking negligent! Read More

Privacy Climate Change

Privacy storms have increased in frequency and intensity, and it’s getting worse.
“Privacy underpins people’s lives. It’s not going away. Technology continues to heap threats on it. Organisations keep on blindly applying those technologies. People are getting fed up with these things. It’s increasingly costing business money, and government agencies trust”. Read More

Should Business be Free to Ignore Consumer Consent and Privacy??

The catch-cry that Zuckerberg used to justify his end-run around privacy protections was ‘the default is social’.
During the last few years, Australian business has been lobbying for the economic potential of all data to be unlocked, not just social media data.
That requires that the already-weak privacy protections be dismantled, to implement the business catch-cry of ‘the default is economic exploitation’.
The chosen vehicle for empowering business is the Productivity Commission. Read More